A grad party gone wrong: Sim Comp 2019 (with interview extension)


We wanted to do something big, with
multiple patients, because it’s not something we do every day.
Thank God. We called it Teen Spirit, and it was the 2019 grad party. All right, sister, you ready? No joke! Let’s go on a mission, man! Let’s go, dude. Our competition today involved our teams going to the site of a stabbing patient. Hey! I want your badge number! We’re just arresting him. Someone who was alert and intoxicated
and laying down, but very chatty — So we’re going to a second assessment on this… Please! Do a third one too. I’m in pre-medicine, you guys. I read about it in a book. I need an epidural! I need phenylephrine! Check my fetal pulse. Check my duodenum. My abdomen is soft, non-tender! and finding themselves— Can somebody please help me?! in the middle of a multiple-patient scenario, people who had overdosed on varying substances, to people who were not breathing and
were really in what we call a peri-arrest stage or a near-death state. A very loud, noisy environment. (inaudible yelling) Very inhospitable to acute medical care. Everybody that has a friend that is down, pick them up. We are going outside now! It really was reflective of the realities
that our teams deal with when they come into someone’s home or someone’s
workplace, going to a mass-casualty and try to make some order out of chaos. So we have 1, 2, 3, 4… A total of eight patients,
including the stabbing patient. What was I thinking?
I’m asked that a lot. I am just so in awe of all of our competitors that we saw their performances today were all amazing. Everybody’s? Yeah. The way they divided,
the way they triaged, where they dragged patients to treat them was all really
evident in the way that we cross-train. The simulation competition that we hold
between our bases is a reflection of the work that we do to prepare our teams for
day-to-day operations. This is core to our education. Managing these scenarios
and getting better at this is really going to just make us better for the
real world out there and for the patients that we’re looking after every day. This level of simulation creates excellent providers in critical care. I’m giving you one of these! Yeah, man! So can you get some blood off of that… (FINISHING HORN BLARES) (cheers and applause) Good job! That case was so crazy. Well, thank you for that! Who wants a hug? I’m just so excited to have hosted such
a successful day, and I’m really proud of our Team Saskatoon. Go, guys! What was I thinking? I’m asked that a lot Well, we hosted here the last time was
five years ago, and we had a pretty crazy sim, and we had police, we had EMS, we
had fire, and I wanted to think of something that was equally impressive
with a lot of confederates. We have an amazing village of people here that help
with the sim, and to pull off something like this, this isn’t just one person.
This is many people, and it’s a lot of work, so we always have
just amazing buy-in here, and I feel like we train our people all year round by
doing different scenarios and different ASIs and different practice sims, so our
base is very sim-savvy. All the Foundation people, our admin people, our
pilots. So we wanted to use them, and I think today that was pretty evident as
everyone was all involved. Our scenario was, we called it Teen Spirit, and
it was the 2019 grad party. So one of the challenges is, I wanted to stay within
the demographic of, you know, 17-, 18-year-old kids. So we had seven confederates
that were PCP students that are just finishing up their practicum. They’ve
actually been to the base before just doing a little bit of training here and
there, and so they were a little bit familiar, and they were extremely keen, so
we actually enlisted them to be our patients. They’re very used to doing sim
in their training as well, so I figured it would be right in their wheelhouse.
Now, for the rest of the graduates we actually enlisted the Evan Hardy (Collegiate) drama
department, which was just phenomenal. Those kids were amazing. So we had 20
19-year-old—or, sorry—18-year-old students who actually are the
graduating class of 2019. When I contacted their teacher, he was
more than happy to help us out. I went to the school and briefed
with the students and took some some footage of previous competitions so they
really knew what they were getting themselves into, and they were
more than excited to do it. So we had a total of 60 people here
today. We don’t get to do situations like this. We don’t do mass casualties that
often, but for us, when you do, there’s really limited limited space in our
practice where we can actually train for that, so for this we wanted to do
something big with multiple patients because it’s not something we do every
day. Thank God. But, yeah, I think it’s important because managing these
scenarios and getting better at this is really going to just make us better for
the actual real world out there and for the patients that we’re
looking after every day.

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