English Pronunciation: T after R like in PARTY – American English


This is yet another video on the letter T.
I’ve already done a few videos on it, but it’s such a big subject, I can’t quite seem
to get away from it. Today we’re going to talk about this case: party, party. Do you
hear how the T is being pronounced here? Party. If you’ve already seen my video on T pronunciations,
then you know when the letter T or double T comes between two vowel sounds, that it is often
pronounced in everyday speech by native speakers as a D sound. For example, butter, water.
But I got an email from someone recently saying that he’s noticed when the letter T comes
after the R and before a vowel, that in this case too, it is sometimes pronounced as a
D. And I admit, I’ve noticed this myself. Now, I’m not saying that new English speakers
should try to do this. But I am saying I’ve noticed that native speakers to it, so let’s
point it out, let’s talk about it, so you know what’s happening when you hear it. The
R consonant sound. When it is not at the beginning of a syllable, whether by itself or in a cluster,
it sounds just like the ‘ur’ as in ‘her’ vowel. For example, in the word alert, alert. Here
it is the R consonant sound, but it’s just like the ur vowel sound, rr, rr. So when the
R comes after the vowel or diphthong in a syllable, it functions much like the ‘ur’
vowel sound. For example in the word alert, alert alert, there is no change in sound there
from the ‘ur’ as in ‘her’ vowel symbol to the R consonant symbol. Ur, it’s all just
one sound. And this R consonant as a vowel sound occurs any time the R consonant comes
after the vowel or diphthong in a syllable. For example in the word ‘father’, er, er.
It’s that same sound, even in a syllable where there is a distinct, separate vowel sound
before the R consonant. For example, in the word ‘part’. Ah, rr. Part, part, part. It
may be a little quicker here, but it’s that same R consonant as vowel sound. This is why
native speakers might pronounce it as a D when it comes after this sound and before
a vowel sound. It’s that same rule, when it comes between two vowel sounds, even though
it would be written in IPA with the R consonant sound. The R consonant sound in these cases
is just like the ‘ur’ as in ‘her’ vowel sound. Let’s look at some examples. Alerted, alerted.
I’ve alerted the staff. Article, article. I read that article. Charter, charter. They’ll
sign the charter tomorrow. Mortified, mortified. I was mortified. Sorted, sorted. We sorted
it out. Vertical, vertical. Please draw a vertical line. You may find that you hear
this not only within a word, but in a phrase. When a word ends with -rt, and the next word
begins with a vowel. Let’s look at some examples of that. Part of, part of. It’s part of the
problem. Sort of, sort of, it sort of got out of hand. Expert in, expert in. He’s an
expert in pronunciation. Airport on, airport on. I want to get to the airport on time.
As I said, if you’re not comfortable with integrating this into your speech, that’s
ok. But you probably will hear native speakers do it. Part of, part of, part of, part of.
When the T gets changed to a D sound, it does smooth out the line somewhat. Part of, part
of, part of. And linking and smoothing things out is a big part of American English. That’s
it, and thanks so much for using Rachel’s English

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Comments

  1. hahaha she can't speak and Read ARABIC Zoz , She does'nt know Arabic words رجل Ragol ,,,,,, Ragol means (Man)
    But there is some thing i wanna tell you if i wanna use this word i write RAJOL instead of RAGOL

  2. You are using regional speech. It is also very common to hear the following: 'alert' [?a] as there is a a glottal in front of the mid low vowel.  Also in the case of 'party' [pa?di] or [pa?thi] (not switching to the real IPA on this keyboard) the glottal stop in the USA is not used as much as in the UK but this is a case where you will find it.

  3. hello rachel. I need your help :(! I am so frustrated.  When I say party the 'T' sounds like a "long d'. Like: Parrrdddy. and when I say 'word' it also sound like "wrddddd" like the t from water. please help me rachel :(!

  4. How much I am thankful to you for bringing this subject up! Really improved my pronunciation. I used to pronounce t in the word Article for years so far!! Now anymore, though. Thanks.

  5. And this is why I love American pronunciation 🙂     What about 'tomorrow'?  I've heard that 't' pronounced as 'd' sometimes. (American movies, sitcoms, etc) For example: See you tomorrow. Rachel, could you please help me?
    Many thanks!

  6. In the IPA for the word 'alert', you have the schwa and then the L and the vowel '3' as in 'bed', however, when you pronounce the word alert, I hear 2 schwas instead, did you make a mistake when you typed the IPA?

  7. I find it really hard to pronounce these words, but my question is: is it OK to use American accent while pronouncing some words like British people?

  8. Hey Rachel! Your channel is great! Keep up with the good work. I've studied English for 8 years but I'm still not able to pronounce some words correctly like martyr, harder, shorter, etc. I hardly ever have problems with pronunciation because I practice a lot. But I just can't pronounce these words right! Even after repeating the words a million times and being able to pronounce it correctly once or twice, I can't say them easily. What should I do? 🙁

  9. Hey Rachel, all ur videos really helped me. Can you pronounce model, photo, pretty, illuminati ? Thank you 🙂

  10. i really can't sound like u do my voice change comlitly when i sone like u i feel like is not me who talk 😛 actely is so hared to do it like u you are perfect love u so much from morocco

  11. That "t" pronunciation is so hard for me. I'm trying for a long time, and my tongue doesn't obey me. it is practically impossible for me to say the word "party". I'm brazilian.

  12. as a spanish speaker i wanna ad that when you say the letter "D" or its at the beginning of a word (different), it sounds like a D, but when in the middle of a word(middle) it sou ds more like an R (at least to spanish speakers), hence why we have so much trouble saying party, and no one explains it from our point of view. to us it just sound pary kind of. so maybe you can give spanish speakers more insight if you never knew that we wont understand the T sounds like a D, because D has 2 different sounds, one sounds like a D and the other sound like an R Kind of; to us at least.

  13. I like all your vídeos. It´s are fantastics!!!
    I hardly know pronounce English well (Google Tradutor).
    Very, very, very congratulations, Rachel!!!

  14. I have learned that the sound /t/ has four varieties. The [t] in the the world "star, bat, rat" The aspired T like "too,top, potato" and the flapping sounds. personally I think that the flapping sounds is like an "r" in Spanish. For example; letter, pretty. there is another one which is a glotal stop like in the words "batman, button. The /t/ after a /r/ becomes into a flapping sound? I get a little bit lose.

  15. This is a very useful video. I have been living in Canada for a few months now and I still struggle with words like party (which I tend to use often as a college student). In my native language both r and t are very hard sounds and r's are rolling. Watching your video and practicing really helps!

  16. hi Rachel, how are you?
    first i gotta say you are amazing. Your videos helped me so much that people dont think I am an immigrant anymore.
    The only problem I have is the doing the T sound after R sound like you roll your tongue for R sound but then you flatten your tongue for T sound. For me to be able to do that, I have to slow down while speaking cuz it takes like a split second to flatten my tongue and make the T sound. Any advice?

  17. Thank you, Rachel! I had problems with this subject and with little practice my pronunciation is much better 🙂 Cheers from Croatia!

  18. I want your help to learn british english and mostly prounciation.which english is spoken at international level as well as MNCs.please suggest me chapter page no.

  19. Thanks Rachel ! I had problem with "ðər" in the word "Father". Moreover, I can't speak fluently if in a sentence with "ð" and "θ", although I pronounce correctly. Help me, please!

  20. hey Rachel!
    I've been watching your videos from many days and I just loved them.
    would you please tell me the correct pronunciation of the word 'iron'?

  21. hi Rachel thanks for your very helpful videos, I was in need to this video but I still face some troubles in pronunciation of the long words that contain the T pronounced as d for instance " opportunity" " responsibility"

  22. how do you pronounce the d in charter, mortified and so on without it sounding so clearlly? And I also have a problem – when I try to pronounce these words, my r sounds Russian and I have to skip it but by doing so I sound British 🙁

  23. That´s because the ¨r¨ sound becomes syllabic, this is called syllabicity in phonetics when a consonant becomes a prominent o central element in the syllable. The same applies to the ¨L¨ sound in for example ¨little¨.

  24. Really interesting!! All the words and phrases given by you at the end of the video are pronounced with the flap T in google translator. I hadn't noticed that, even though I use a lot the google translator. I know it's not a perfect tool but it helps.

  25. In this video you started with PARTY but never explained the pronunciation of this particular word. I'm really having hard times with it 🙂

  26. I have such a hard time pronouncing words such as charted, harder, carter, murder. I sound like charer harer carer murer. What do you suggest to improve?

  27. I just watched the video about 'r' sound and this. Based on what I learned from the video, when I pronounce, for example, 'border', my tongue is pulled back to make the first 'r' sound but it's really hard for me to make 'd' sound naturally right after. My tongue has to travel back and forth to pronounce the first 'r' , and 'd' then again the last 'r'. or in other way, we could say 'Bor – d – er'. If I try to pronounce the 'd' sound clearly, it does not sound like native American English. But when I hear Americans saying the word, it sounds very natural. What's the secret? Can you help??

  28. Hi Rachel, how come with many English sounds (like this T sound) even though I can match a native's pronunciation when speaking with a normal voice, I can't quite get the pronunciation right when I try to speak very loud or shout. Has anyone ever asked you that? How would you scream "Party" with this d-like T pronunciation?

  29. Hi Rachel I've noticed that you pronounced the t in "part" as a true T not as a stop T did I hear correctly? if so do words ending with rt pronounced so such as, effort, heart, hurt etc.

  30. Am I correct in noticing there is a difference between the flapped t coming between vowels and the one between "r" and a vowel in terms of execution? While latter is approached downwards (as in party, starting) the former seems to be sounded with more of an upward brush on the same alveolar ridge (as in water, better). I presume it's down to where the tongue finds itself leading up to the flap t, though not sure how much of a difference it makes to the ear.

  31. The one and only word I can't pronounce correctly in American English is 'liberty'
    Please help hahaha

  32. I just wonder why u don't pronounce PARTY? I think it's the most difficult example that u should mention in ur video. Anyway thanks for the great video.

  33. all my life's long i was dreaming to have a friend from USA to chat with and to learn how to imporove my pronounciation . Rachel , Would you please help me and make my dream come true .. it will be the best thing that ever happen to me especially from a perfect one like you .. by the way your face expressions are Gorgeous and give a meaning to the word when you pronounce 😍..
    regards : mohamed from Egypt

  34. Rachel! It's Roy from Lebanon!
    You cannot imagine how much your videos do help! Especially this one! I'm not exaggerating here but I have been really wanting to pronounce the word "party" like native Americans but unfortunately I could never find a way. Now that I have you, I think I can never find a better one!! =D
    Thanks a lot! Greetings =)

  35. Hello, i have a question to you, i'am wondering if i could have an answer.
    Why is the sound T not pronounced as R by the Americans in the world (Fatigue)?

  36. HI RACHEL, A FRIEND OF MINE TOLD ME ABOUT YOUR VIDEO. IN FACT, THIS SOME YEARS I HAVE BEEN LEARNING ENGLISH AND SOME MONTHS AGO I DISCOVERED THE AMERICAN ACCENT. I AM GLAD TO HAVE FOUND THAT VIDEO. THIS IS WHAT I WAS LOOKING FOR. GREAT LESSON. THANKS FOR ALL DEAR COACH

  37. I see now, so you pronounce the first word with the r and then right after the light d, like in party, alerted, etc. Thank you!

  38. I cannot do it! 😭😭😭 It happens the same with dirty, 30, I have a strong accent and if I try to do it it sounds like I'm saying only one T or my D pronunciation is too strong…

  39. 3:00 I’m confused, Rachel. You mean the “t” after an “r” (between two vowels) becomes a flap T, like in “petty” or a full on “d”?

  40. La gran dificultad de muchos hispanohablantes es cuando se juega estas letras "rl" y "rt" y en ocaciones "rld". por ejemplo en GIRLS, aunque no lo crean la mayoria lo pronuncia como georr, igual con eart lo pronuncian ierr o world también lo pronuncian como uorroul. Si podrías Miss Rachel en esas simples combinaciones como colocar the mouth pliss 🙁

  41. Anyone struggling like me?
    Parry party parrly parrry parldy pardly party party party
    The British accent is easier tbh you just gotta say "paati" lol

  42. When Americans say that the t sounds like the d sound, they really mean the t sound like the Spanish r as in pero, caro, coro, etc. Because their mouth move and articula different from most English learner (in my case, Mexican). So, don’t misunderstand them. Remember that whenever Americans speak about the t sound, they are speaking about the d, which is the r in Spanish.

  43. My question is that where should I put my tongue? After 'er' sound, I have to move my tongue to the back of my top teeth to make 'd' sound. This makes causes some delay between two sounds and it doesn't sound natural.

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